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of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
elbaradei. he is the former head of the international atomic energy agency and a nobel peace prize winner. . >> ifill: thank you for joinings us. you called egypt to reject the -- what's recan to how it turned out? >> it is going to pass but it's a sad day in my view for egypt because it is going to institutionalize stability, very polarizing charter, defines a lot of the basic human value like treatment woman of religion, freedom of expression, so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. however, we would have to take it from there and i think that we treat that constitution try to get another assembly to work, that is not polarizing but establish a consensus among the two divided fraction of the society. right now we have educated middle class on one camp and the so-called islamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health
, among other things, ancient and modern lives in her adopted >> there's weirdly a lot of energy in athens, and, whether it's good or bad, there's a feeling. >> brown: what kind of energy? >> maybe there's a "there's nothing left to lose" as a kind of freedom as well. people are going out to plays. they're still going out and doing things, but, you know with less money. but there's an urgency. poetry meetings are very well literary events are packed. >> brown: why do you think that is? >> well, it's inexpensive, inexpensive entertainment. ( laughs ) but i think people want to be together. they want to be talking to people.ton >> brown: the crisis around here, she says, rarely makes it into her poetry in an explicit way. but she did have one direct hit for us, a playful work-in- progress called "austerity measures." >> i love the term "austerity measures." it sounds so poetic. >> brown: even though it's so" real, nitty-gritty in what's happening here? >> yes, i love the idea of "measures" as, you know, verse. it was prompted by a headline that i read somewhere, which w
of the kingdom. and it's this kind of, you know, "don't slow me down with the facts" impatience and energy that we get in paul's letters. >> paul's very first letter-- the earliest single writing that we have in the newestament-- is i thessalonians, and already in i thessalonians paul is having to console them when people are starting to die within the congregation and the kingdom hasn't arrived yet. >> narrator: paul believed the earthly world order was about to change, that time was running out, and the end was at hand. >> clearly the... the message about the... the coming end time was the part that would have been threatening to a roman official, and would have been threatening to any native population that had vested some authority in roman officialdom. >> narrator: paul attacked those who preferred peace and security to the coming kingdom of god. >> ( dramatized ): when they say, "there is peace and security," then sudden destruction will come upon them. >> scholars have wondered who this people is who are saying "peace and security." some interpreters think that it's the first lapsed
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)